News Flash

Posted on: August 24, 2019

Fight Lead Exposure!

cdclead2019

Children between 1 and 6 years of age are most at risk for lead poisoning. It is caused by breathing or swallowing lead, but is 100% preventable. If you live in a home built before 1978, or are visiting relatives that do, be sure to frequently wash your c...

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Health Department
Posted on: August 23, 2019

Reduce Your Risk of Rabies

Install a chimney cap to prevent raccoons and other wild animals from living in your home.  http://www.michigan.gov/documents/rabiesbrochure_1_6884_7.pdf

Health Department
Posted on: August 22, 2019

Campground Safety

Did you know that the Health Department inspects permanent AND temporary campgrounds to ensure they are safe for your enjoyment?  All permanent campgrounds in Lenawee County are inspected annually, and any campgrounds (5+ recreational units) that...

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Health Department
Posted on: August 19, 2019

Body Art Safety

Picture of an infected tattoo on a right foot.

Residents interested in body art  can protect themselves against infection by choosing licensed body art facilities when deciding to get a tattoo or piercing.  You can find more info at http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdch/LicensedBody...

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Health Department
Posted on: August 17, 2019

Picnic Safety

picnic safety 2

Avoid getting sick! Are you sure you are keeping your food safe? Keep cold foods cold when picnicking by setting up in the shade and frequently changing the ice that sits under your deli platters and food trays. Remember: cold food must be held at 41 F or...

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Health Department
Posted on: August 12, 2019

Reduce Your Risk of Rabies

rabies 2019

Never leave infants or young children alone with any animal, and teach children to never approach an unfamiliar wild animal. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/rabiesbrochure_1_6884_7.pdf  

Health Department
Posted on: August 10, 2019

Picnic Safety

summercookingsafety

Avoid getting a bug! Keep cold foods cold when picnicking by using lots of ice in a cooler.  Use a thermometer to be sure your cold foods don't rise above 41 degrees Fahrenheit, and use separate ice for your drinks.

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Health Department